#2147 The wrinkle effect


Summer is the one time of the year when we all get to relax. It’s hot, we’re on holiday and long days at the office are replaced by easy afternoons at the beach. But that doesn’t mean that you should throw style out of the window and dive for your nearest pair of workout shorts or that old tee shirt you wear to bed. That’s the way of my countrymen, and it’s not something to be emulated. We New Zealanders are famously laid-back; and we don’t have a history of well-dressed men (quite the opposite, in fact). Italian sprezzatura, French nonchalance and English put-togetherness never made their way to our fair shores.

So I’m excited to announce that for Spring/Summer 2012, Ermenegildo Zegna has developed a selection of luxurious cloths with a quite extraordinary wrinkled texture. Showing up in suits, shirts and separates, the crushed cloths exemplify the adage that men look their most elegant when they’re at their most relaxed. Why do Italians always look so good? Because they’re comfortable in their own clothing. Made from crushed silk, cotton blends and drill, the collection’s cloths are so finely woven that the surface detail has the appearance of delicately cracked glass, with a gently metallic sheen. If that’s not easy luxury, I don’t know what is.

1. The lightly coloured pinstripe shirting also has the wrinkled effect, but don’t be afraid to break tradition and wear a freshly pressed shirt and tie with your wrinkled suit.

2. Come to think of it, also don’t be afraid to try the jacket on its own with your other favourite pieces (be they wrinkled or not).

3. Another thing this collection has in common with my daily uniform: The colours are a beautiful sun-faded hue (only it’s on purpose in Zegna’s case, not due to overuse).

4. Silk suiting is about as luxurious as you could ever hope to find – women, men, and your body will love you for wearing it.




This post originally appeared on zegna.com

I LIKE YOU!

share on TumblrShare on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Comments

  1. JacobRoberts says

    Three things: 1) Love the crinkly, iron-free casual look. Practical is always a plus when it comes to fashion! 2) While Europeans are by far the best dressed people in the world, trust me – there are many, many fashion mistakes here too! 3) While Kiwi men still have a long way to go despite great improvement in fashion, it’s important to note that maybe the average American man should be pulled up? Just a thought…

  2. Jimmy says

    i personally like things to wrinkle naturally and they some how capture that. people get to caught up on looking “perfect” especially in suits.

  3. Ramesh says

    I’ve just received the FW 2012 brochure from Zegna Queen St. Two of its three pages of text have specific Chinese references, from ‘Shanghai noir’ to the Cultural Revolution. Hence there’s more than a passing possibility, Isaac, that these wrinkled SS 2012 fabrics are designed to appeal to a style of Chinese aesthetic.
    Porcelain is culturally prestigious for East Asians, and certain styles of Song and Ming dynasty porcelain cultivated an ‘eggshell cracking’, often with an oily, glassy overglaze. The craquelure which was valued has a fine, even unflustered pattern over the whole body of the object, and is sometimes described as possessing ‘elegant harmony.’ Sounds quite similar to the description here of ‘delicately cracked glass with a metallic sheen.’
    With the luxury market skyrocketing in China, it makes commercial sense to widen the cultural referents of the merchandise.

  4. isaaclikes says

    Very interesting – thanks for that piece of info, I’ll go back and take a second look!
    Sent via BlackBerry from T-Mobile

  5. Ramesh says

    Isaac, NYC’s Metropolitan Museum of Art has the best Western collection of Chinese imperial porcelain outside of the London museums.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>